SHARP HOME

Tuesday, 28 May 2013

How to put off replacing your household goods


Even with extended warranties, and—when that runs out—content-specific insurance, we still don't like to see the break-down of our belongings. The inconveniences and expenses of having to replace items we rely on for a smooth week are things we would rather avoid altogether. Fortunately, there are reliable ways to delay needing to this. Below we'll consider some of the vital pieces in your home that are costly to replace, and the various ways that you can avoid replacing them prematurely.

Dishwasher: The good news about dishwashers is that these are pretty low maintenance appliances, and therefore do not require a great deal of labour on your part to keep them in tip top shape. That said, there are times when they don't function correctly, and there are things you can do to combat this. Cleaning your dishwasher is important. Running an empty wash with no detergent, using a cup of vinegar, will clear away all soap residue to keep it working optimally. If you discover rust on the interior of the dishwasher, be sure to treat it right away. Usually, a steel wool pad will be effective enough to remove it, but if it's really bad, you may need a specifically formulated solvent. Over the years of use, debris will collect in the holes at the bottom of your dishwasher; removing them manually will help it to work more effectively. If you have issues with your dishwasher draining, check the filter, clean it well, and give it a run after you clean.

Computer: Is there any household item that causes more grief, consternation, or panic when it goes awry? Be sure to back up your data frequently, but also in multiple places. External hard-drives are wonderful devices, but they too are susceptible to malfunctions, so be sure to use an additional alternative form of back up. On top of this, be sure to stay on top of software upgrades to protect your data from loss or harm via viruses, and remember to secure your information. If you are using a desktop computer, you should also make a habit of cleaning it as needed. You would be amazed at the amount of dust that accumulates inside your tower; this does affect your computer's ability to function optimally, so be sure to keep an eye on this.

Deep freezer: If you use your freezer to stockpile on groceries that have gone on sale, you know this one is invaluable to you. The first bit of advice we have regarding the deep freezer is that if you are about to buy one, and if space allows it, consider the classic chest type over the newer upright versions. While the upright versions are attractive in their limited use of floor space, they actually consume twice as much energy as their horizontal counterparts. Additionally, in the case of a power outage, a chest freezer will hold cold air in for a long time, while an upright freezer will not. With either model, be sure to watch for the buildup of ice on the walls over time, and to remove it. This will keep it functioning optimally.

Washing machine: While the new, energy efficient front-loading washing machines are a great boon for laundry bills and environmental impact, you should be sure you know how to take care of yours. The primary complaint around these is the build up of mold on the inside. This is a fairly easy problem to prevent: leaving the washer door open after use will allow it to dry without this happening. If space does not allow for this, then wiping it dry, then leaving the door ajar (almost closed, but not snapped shut) should do the trick as well.

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